Life as a Resident

THE FIRST YEAR

During the first year of residency you are the primary physician to Bronx-Lebanon patients. Perhaps more than at any other hospital, you gain essential experience with many kinds of medical patients by taking responsibility for them in the hospital and by recruiting them for your office practice, where you follow them throughout your residency.

During the first year, you will rotate through a range of pediatric and sub-specialty rotations while maintaining an active practice in the general outpatient setting one day a week. You will also complete a block rotation in community pediatrics.

A typical day for the first year resident during these months combines experience and didactic learning.

Hour Assignment
7:00 a.m. - 8:00 a.m. Work Rounds
8:00 a.m. - 9:00 a.m. Required Educational Activity
9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m. Attending Rounds
11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Floor Work
12:30 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. Lunch
1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. Core Curriculum Lecture
2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. Radiology Rounds & Multidisciplinary Rounds
3:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. Floor Work
5:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. Sign Out

Call and Night Float
The Department of Pediatrics fully complies with ACGME guidelines and New York State regulations restricting work hours for residents. The first year residents are on call every fourth night with a night shift system in place in the NICU only.

THE SECOND YEAR

As a matter of scheduling, the second year resident's typical day is similar to the first year. Your role in inpatient care is, however, a very different one. As the team leader you supervise a team of interns and serve as a role model to the junior residents. Also, as a second year resident you will complete some of your required and elective sub-specialty rotations (see third year below).

As in the first year, you will continue to follow your regular patient panel in the general pediatric clinic.

A typical day for a second year resident combines learning with leadership.

Hour Assignment
7:00 a.m. - 7:20 a.m. Sign-out Rounds
7:20 a.m. - 8:00 a.m. Work rounds as team leader
8:00 a.m. - 9:00 a.m. Morning report/Required educational activity
9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m. Attending rounds/General/Sub-specialty/ED Clinic/ED
11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Supervision on the floor/ED/Clinics
1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. Core Curriculum Lecture
2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. Radiology Rounds & Multidisciplinary Rounds
3:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. Supervision on floors/clinics
5:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. Sign Out rounds

Call
Second year residents are on call every fourth night while assigned to floors and ICUs. One and one–half weekend ED calls plus four short (5-11pm) ED calls.

THE THIRD YEAR

As a senior year resident you will take further responsibility for patient care and sharpen your sub-specialty skills in preparation for the general pediatric boards. You will choose in-depth sub-specialty experiences from, among the following:

A typical day for a third year resident combines learning with leadership.

sub-specialty sub-specialty
Cardiology Nephrology
Allergy/Immunology Neurology
Endocrinology Hematology/Oncology
Gastroenterology Pulmonology
Infectious Diseases Pediatric Radiology
Child Psychiatry  

As in the first two years, you will continue to expand your primary care practice, gaining speed and accuracy in the management of patients with multiple medical problems and practicing with still greater independence. A typical day for a third year resident stresses leadership and in-depth study of specific areas of medical practice.

On-Call
Third year residents are on-call an average of every fourth night. As the senior pediatric resident in the hospital, you act as a consultant to the floors and the intensive care units. While assigned to the ED, third year residents complete one-weekend call and three short ED calls.

BEYOND

Graduates of the program are well equipped to handle the diversity and complexity of primary care pediatric practices. In fact, most of our graduates go into practice upon leaving the program. Many of our graduates have opened practices in the area surrounding the hospital or in hospital based practices. Hospital admitting privileges are offered to program graduates planning to practice in the area.

A significant number go on to sub-specialty fellowship training in centers across the country in neonatology, allergy/immunology, endocrinology, nephrology, critical care, hematology/oncology, neurology and infectious diseases. The faculty continues to provide career counseling even after graduation.